Previous Workshops

GPW2016: Youth promoting peace by addressing vulnerabilities and building resilience

The Fourth Annual Global Peace Workshop 2016 focused on understanding the vulnerabilities and resilience of people living through conflict. The workshop took place between 18-22 July 2016. In this workshop our goals were to examine how people experience exclusion, discrimination and marginalisation  including threats to their physical, economic and social security  to understand how resilience helps them cope as best they can. We often assume that the impact of violence is indiscriminate, yet it actually affects people differently according to their levels of vulnerability and resilience. Understanding this is critical to responding to conflict in ways that support people’s efforts and does not erode their resilience. Workshop groups examined the theme in three different dimensions:

  1. Peacebuilding 101: an introduction to the field
  2. People on the move: examining the human security challenges of migration
  3. Children in war: reclaiming lost generations

GPW2015 – Youth Promoting Peace through Global Citizenship, Social Justice and Mobilisation

As a joint project of Centre for Peace, Trust and Social Relations of Coventry University and Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University Mugla/ Turkey, GPW2016 aimed at promoting peace world-wide through identifying and introducing unconventional wisdom and practice. The workshop took place between 29th  June –3rd  July 2015.

GPW2015  explored the role of young people in promoting Peace through Global Citizenship, Social Justice and Mobilization and welcomed people from all countries to come together to identify the challenges and opportunities facing young people in building a culture of peace. GPW2015 bought together 89 young practitioners, academics and students of peace and conflict studies from 53 countries. Introduced by high-profile keynotes speakers, the workshop provided participants with the opportunity to explore following workshop themes:

  1. Citizen 2.0. – Are a new generation of ‘digital natives’ talking peace to power in a conflicted world?
  2. The INTERNationals – Valuing young people’s unpaid contributions to building a more peaceful world.
  3. Justice after conflict –  To forgive and forget, or remember and change?
  4. Going Glocal – Empowering local communities through local/global engagement.

 GPW2014 – Youth Promoting Peace through Art, Culture and Tourism

2nd Global Peace Workshop (GPW 2014) was hosted by Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, Muğla /Turkey. In this second annual GPW we explored the role of young people in promoting Peace through Arts, Culture and Tourism and identified the challenges and opportunities facing young people in building a culture of peace. GPW 2014 brought together practitioners, academics and students of peace and conflict studies from institutions worldwide. Introduced by high-profile keynotes speakers, the workshop provided participants with the opportunity to explore one of five following workshop themes:

  1. Connecting Communities through Theatre, Poetry and the Spoken Word
  2. Cultural Diplomacy and Dialogue – Where Next?
  3. Safeguarding Culture
  4. Travelling and Tourism During and After Conflict
  5. Picturing Others: Portraying Conflict through Fine Art and Photography

 

GPW2013 – Youth in Conflict Transformation, Post Conflict Peacebuilding and Reconstruction

The first annual Global Peace Workshop was held 1-5 July 2013 in Trabzon, Turkey, with participants from around the world.  The workshop gave us the opportunity to widen the lens beyond the conventional examination of youth as conflict actors, their mobilisation as combatants, and their passive role in post-war reconstruction through disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration programmes for ex-combatants.  The workshop challenged participants to look beyond the dominant theories relating to youth in conflict which place emphasis on population structures, the greed-grievance model and spoiler theories.  By adopting a socio-political approach, we examined how young people’s relationships with societal structures are formed and negotiated, and how this impacts on peace processes in contested and divided places.

In this workshop we took stock of the social and political power that youth have managed to claim for themselves over recent years. We looked at their participation through established socio-political structures and social activism online. We also explored the consequences of excluding young people and their interests from political debate in post-conflict societies, asking how we can avoid the tendency to sideline them from decision-making and comparing different models of participation in a bid to ask ‘what works?’.